Hurricane Ian makes landfall in southwest Florida

Hurricane Ian makes landfall in southwest Florida

TAMPA, Fla. — Hurricane Ian has made landfall in southwest Florida. It moved inland early Wednesday afternoon in Cay Costa, Fla. with max winds of 155 mph. After coming ashore on Cayo Costa, Ian made another landfall just south of Punta Gorda with 145 mph winds.

Along with high-end Category 4 Hurricane winds, Ian will continue to bring catastrophic impacts, including life-threatening storm surge, and coastal and inland flooding to the Florida peninsula.


Ian strengthened into a Category 4 hurricane early Wednesday morning and winds peaked at 155 mph before landfall.

Ian will be weakening over land, but is expected to track northeast from there to across Polk County and Orlando. Winds could still be hurricane force in Polk County Thursday overnight into morning.

Ian is moving toward the northeast at 9 mph.

Flooding rains are still expected all across Tampa Bay to Orlando. Ian will move slowly enough that rain bands will continue push across the area from now through Thursday morning, with some isolated totals of 15 to 20 inches possible. That is a long time for tropical storm/hurricane conditions/rainfall to last.

Ian will continue moving north-northeastward after making landfall in southwest Florida, and eventually move back offshore into the Atlantic.

Now the main impacts for the Tampa Bay region will be as follows:

  • Heavy rain with the potential for flooding in low-lying areas
  • Strong wind gusts, strongest south east and south of Tampa (strongest winds in Sarasota, Manatee, Hardee, and Polk County)
  • Isolated quick passing tornadoes possible

The storm is going to slow down so this will still be a couple very sloppy days with lots of rain persisting through Wednesday and Thursday.  The good news is dry air will wrap around on the backside Friday setting us up for a dry, less humid weekend ahead.

 

Spaghetti models or plots show a series of individual computer forecast models together on one map. They are useful to give insight into whether multiple models are in agreement on the path of the storm but they do not address the storm’s forecast intensity, winds, flooding and storm surge potential or other data. Tap here for more details on how to best use these models

 

River Flooding Warnings

Anclote River including Elfers at Little Road – major flooding is forecast

Withlacoochee including US 301 Trilby, Croom, SR 200 Holder, US 41 Dunnellon – moderate flooding is forecast

Hillsborough including Morris Bridge, Temple Terrace, Hillsborough River State Park – major flooding is forecast

Cypress Creek including SR 54 Worthington Gardens – major flooding is forecast

Alafia including Lithia, Riverview near US 301 – major flooding is forecast

Little Manatee including Wimauma at US 301 – major flooding is forecast

Manatee including Myakka Head at SR 64, Rye Bridge – major flooding is forecast

Myakka including Myakka River State Park – moderate flooding is forecast

Peace including Bartow, Zolfo Springs at SR 17, Arcadia at SR 70 – major flooding is forecast

Watches and Warnings

A Storm Surge Warning has been issued from the mouth of the St.
Mary’s River to the mouth of the South Santee River, South Carolina.

A Hurricane Warning has been issued from Sebastian Inlet, Florida
northward to the Flagler/Volusia County Line, Florida.

A Hurricane Watch has been issued from the Flagler/Volusia County
Line to the South Santee River.

A Tropical Storm Warning has been extended northward to Little
River Inlet, South Carolina.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for…
* North of Bonita Beach to Anclote River, including Tampa Bay
* Sebastian Inlet to Flagler/Volusia County Line

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for…
* Suwannee River southward to Flamingo
* Tampa Bay
* Flagler/Volusia Line to the mouth of the South Santee River
* St. Johns River

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…
* Indian Pass to the Anclote River
* Boca Raton to Sebastian Inlet
* Flagler/Volusia County Line to Surf City
* Lake Okeechobee
* Bimini and Grand Bahama Islands

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for…
* North of South Santee River to Little River Inlet

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for…
* Flagler/Volusia County Line to the South Santee River

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for…
* North of Surf City to Cape Lookout

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, in the indicated locations. For a depiction of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic, available at hurricanes.gov. This is a life-threatening situation. Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials.

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life- threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, in the indicated locations during the next 48 hours.

For storm information specific to your area, please monitor products issued by your national meteorological service.

2:00 A.M. IAN COORDINATES

LOCATION…27.7N 81.1W

ABOUT 55 MI…90 KM SSE OF ORLANDO FLORIDA

ABOUT 55 MI…90 KM SSW OF CAPE CANAVERAL FLORIDA

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…75 MPH…120 KM/H

PRESENT MOVEMENT…NE OR 45 DEGREES AT 9 MPH…15 KM/H

MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…980 MB…28.94 INCHES

WARNINGS vs. WATCHES: What do they mean?

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area, in this case within 24 to 36 hours. Preparationsto protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, during the next 36 hours in the indicated locations. For a depiction of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic, available at hurricanes.gov. This is a life-threatening situation. Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials.

A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, in the indicated locations during the next 48 hours. For a depiction of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic, available at hurricanes.gov.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds, conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, generally within 48 hours.

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